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IMG_2940I am really excited to announce that I will now be a contributing writer for the blog at ModernHomesteaders.net.  I have been a fan of theirs for awhile and being asked to contribute was very flattering and exciting.  I am scheduled to write for them once a week.

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Click Here To Visit Modern Homesteaders

I will be talking about my road to prepping and the accomplishments I have made.  I hope to show how anyone, even if you are on a tight budget, how to start and build up emergency supplies and equipment.  But as importantly, I will be teaching alternative cooking methods, food preservation and other great DIY projects to help save you money.  I will share product reviews and a host of other things that should help you develop your own plan or hone in on the plan you have to move you ahead.

I’ve seen many things happen in the way of disasters.  Things like hurricanes, tornadoes, super storms, terror attacks and an economic system teetering in the brink of decline.  I see families displaced, left without a home to live in or even clothes on their backs.  I see these people at the mercy of charities and government agencies for their very survival.  I don’t want my family to be like those families we all see on television after such a big event. I hope you will follow me as I contribute to the great work Shane is doing at Modern Homesteaders.  If you don’t already subscribe to Modern Homesteaders, please click this link and visit them on Facebook by clicking here.

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I am always excited and look for ways to build my shelf-stable pantry with inexpensive food.  But inexpensive sure does not mean inferior.  Especially when it comes to the topic I address today.

If you are new or have never pressure canned anything, chicken is the single simplest food to start with.  It’s the first thing I canned and highly recommend it.

You may or may not have heard of a company called Zaycon Foods.  Rather than explaining it to you, here is a great video to explain it all.  In short, it’s cheap, fresh and healthy!

Having been introduced to Zaycon, I’m a devoted advocate and client.  To learn more, please click here

But having just purchased 40 pounds of their chicken breasts, I had to get them processed as quickly as possible.  I set out to pressure can most of it.

Supplies

 

 

Start by gathering all your supplies.  You need your jars, rings, lids, jar lifter, sharp knife (for trimming your chicken), pressure canner, saucepan (large enough accommodate the lids and rings you will be sanitizing).

 

 

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Before you start anything, inspect the rubber ring in your canner (if you are using a canner with this), inspect the vent to make sure there is no obstructions, making sure there is no blockage.  I hope you can see here the blue color in the center of this photo.  It is your view through the vent in the lid of your canner.

 

 

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I begin by getting my jars ready by washing them in hot, soapy water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Get into the habit of checking each jar for any imperfections.  While I wash my jars, I run my finger around the rim to feel for any cracks or other anomalies.

 

 

 

 

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Also, do a visual inspection of each of your jars.  While new jars rarely have cracks or other imperfections, they sometimes do.  And if you are re-using jars, the risk is higher so be sure to use only those jars that are pristine!

 

 

 

 

 

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You have several options for keeping your jars hot while you prepare your chicken.  You can keep them in a large stockpot covered with simmering water or you can do as I do, keep them in a warm oven.  I set mine at 200 degrees.

 

 

 

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Now I put about 3 quarts of water and about 1/8th of a cup of white vinegar in my pressure canner over a low flame (or heat if you are electric).  The vinegar is not necessary if you have soft water.  Mine is a little hard and this will prevent lime buildup in my canner and jars.  It is completely optional.

 

 

 

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After washing your lids and rings, place them in your saucepan over a low simmer.  You do not want to boil them.  Just warm enough to soften the wax or rubber ring.

 

 

 

 

 

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One-by-one, I pull out a hot jar and trim and cut my chicken and put them into my jars leaving a 1” headspace.  Whether I am handling raw meat or removing food from my dehydrator, I wear gloves.  In dehydrating, I don’t want to transfer my oils onto the food I just dry.  For raw meat, it is a level of safety.

 

 

 

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I immediately place the filled jar into the canner.  I do not put the lids or rings on them yet.  This will keep the jars hot which is important so they don’t break when the canner comes to temperature.

 

 

 

 

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Once my canner is full of jars, I will put a pinch of salt in each jar.  I use Pink Himalayan because it contains every bit of its’ minerals.  But you can use canning salt.

 

 

 

 

 

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This step is critical in all canning projects.  Never, ever forget to wipe and clean your rims before adding your lids.  When I can meat or food that is particularly oily, I use white vinegar which cuts the greasy residue.

 

 

 

 

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I use metal lids when I use new jars.  But they are good for only one use.  When I buy replacement lids, I purchase either Tattler or 4ever Recap lids.  If you are interested in these lids, here is a video to help you see their value.  I would post one for 4ever Recaps, but could not find one.  But they are essentially the same.  One thing I love about 4ever is that it is a woman owned company.  Hey, it’s personal.  I respect women entrepreneurs.

 

 

 

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As you can see, the same metal rings are used with these lids and can be used several times.

 

 

 

 

 

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With the jars all inside the canner and the lid securely in place, increase the heat under it to build pressure.  In this picture, you can be (behind) the vent where you will place the weight.  In the foreground is another vent on my specific Presto canner.  Not all canners have this.  But if yours does, as pressure builds this element will rattle and shake until stem builds up.  When enough steam builds, this vent will rise and shut allowing the pressure to continue to build.  When this happens, the vent that receives your weight (the one shown in the background) will begin to spew steam.  I allow this to build for 10 minutes before placing the weight on it.

 

 

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This batch contains pint size jars.  I processed it with 10 pounds of pressure for 75 minutes as per the Ball Complete Book.  After 75 minutes, you will turn off your heat and allow the pressure to level out.  This takes about an hour in most cases.  Once the vent in the front drops back into its’ normal position, it will be safe to remove the weight as shown in this photo.  But you must still use caution because your metal canner is still very hot and can cause serious burns.   But you can now remove the canner lid.

 

 

 

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After you remove the canner lid, you will begin taking your jars out of the canner and placing them onto your counter using your jar lifter.  Please, never try using anything but a canning jar lifter.  This can be quite dangerous if you try using tongs or anything else not specifically designed to safely handle boiling hot jars.  The foods in these jars are still boiling aggressively.

 

 

 

 

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You will not allow your jars to set out on your counter overnight to allow them to completely cool down.   You do not want them to be moved or disturbed while they cool and the rings set on the rims.  When using metal lids, you will begin hearing a distinctive “ping” as they seal.  Music to your ears!

 

 

 

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The following morning, I removed all the rings from my jars and tested their seal.  To do this, you simply lift the jar by the rings.  If it sealed as it should have, they will not release.  Now they are ready to be washed because the jars will be oily and a bit icky.  Just wash them in warm, soapy water, rinse and allow to dry.

 

 

 

 

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Once the jars and lids are completely dry, label then with content and date.  In large batches, it’s easy to just print out labels.  If it’s just a few cans, just use a permanent marker to write it on the lids.

 

 

 

 

 

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My yield for approximately 25 pounds of chicken was a dozen pints and six 1 ½ pint jars.  You can store them all in the boxes they came in.

 

 

 

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But I have a canning pantry that beautifully shows off my healthy food and keeps it all readily available for my regular menu planning.  This antique cabinet has two glass-front doors so all my company can see and covet my invaluable prepping skills.

 

 

 

As you can see, following standard practices for sanitation and canning, chicken is quite easy to pressure can.   If you are just beginning to try your hand at pressure canning, this is one of the absolute easiest recipes you will find.  Buying in bulk is cost-effective.  Having your investment safely stored in canning jars requires no electricity and is shelf-stable for up to two years.

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Finally, just to show you that having a jar or two that does not seal only allows you to eat it sooner!  I had one jar that did not seal properly.  But the food inside is still perfectly fine.  I simply added barbeque sauce and we had sandwiches for lunch.   I always plan on how to incorporate whatever I can into a meal within about a week.  And by having this happen to one of my jars allows me to show you how beautiful the canned chicken is.  As you can see, it’s much like canned tuna.  You can see how moist and flaky it is.  You can use this for chicken salad, on green salads, in soups and stews, enchiladas.  Just use your imagination.  It has so many delicious uses.

 

 

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Providence SupremeIn breaking down your preparedness goals, the first step is to determine exactly what you want to accomplish. If you plan to set aside a little money each week or month to go towards your family’s preparedness, you will be surprised what you can afford. Now is the time; make the goal to be prepared.

To start, you could plan a budget for buying emergency supplies that deal with water. A reliable water storage system, such as a 55 gallon barrel or smaller buckets throughout the house, is essential. Water is something that people often forget to store or procrastinate, perhaps because it’s usually so accessible; we have a hard time imagining what life would be like without a working, clean water supply, and it’s also hard to estimate how much water we’re actually using. In fact, water should be the first item on your list of goals, because it is the most crucial item to have available during an emergency. Evaluate both portable and stationary water sources. You could also plan out a budget and save up to buy a great portable water filter or purifier. There are also different types of prepackaged water you can purchase, such as water in pouches or foil-lined cardboard “juice boxes.” These small containers are excellent for small children and babies.

Another step to reach your preparedness goal is to set up a schedule of certain things you want to buy each month Maybe you want to be prepared by having 72-hour kits for everyone in your family. Perhaps you want a total preparedness package consisting of 72-hour kits and a year’s supply of food storage for each member of your family. These kits and packages can cost a pretty penny, but when broken down into “baby steps,” the cost becomes quite manageable.

One month, you could focus on researching and buying emergency preparedness items that deal with on area, such as warmth. This might mean looking for emergency blankets, sleeping bags, hand and body warmers, and wool blankets. Another month you could focus on purchasing items that deal with emergency lighting, such as 100 hour candles, kerosene lamps, light sticks, matches, or flashlights. It seems like a lot, but purchasing these items in stages will help ease the stress on your pocketbook and your time.

Once you’ve gotten to a comfortable place with emergency items, the next step is saving enough money to build up your food storage. You can accomplish this by setting aside a weekly amount and using the save money to buy canned food and cooking essentials at the end of the month. By rotating your food storage into your daily recipes, you can eat the foods you enjoy without worrying about expiration dates. One good way to rotate food is to buy 2 or 3 cans of canned goods, especially when they are on sale. This way, you stock up gradually rather than in one big splurge. If you actually use your food storage, the cost will never exceed the original investment. Remember, normal canned vegetables and fruits come in smaller cans, have a shorter shelf life, and can only stack so high. They are also packed with excess water, which makes them weigh more while also reducing shelf life. Freeze-dried or dehydrated #10 cans of food are packaged compactly and efficiently, and they can be stored over 5 to 30 years (compared to the 1 year shelf life of store-bought canned food). There are also plenty of resources that can teach you to preserve and can fresh food for use when it isn’t in season. Check out your local library or an internet search for some pointers.
Another goal could be to encourage your neighbors and family members to start preparing for their own families. When figuring out gifts for holidays or birthdays this year, consider gifts of preparedness to help your family members and loved ones plan for the future.

Think about setting goals for food storage and preparing for emergencies. If you make a plan and a budget, it will be easier to get the things that you need without added stress and worry. Now is the time to get prepared. You can do it!

Visit my THRIVE Life Store to see all that the above-mentioned food and emergency supplies that are available to help you.  As a THRIVE Independent Consultant, I’m here to help and support you.  Leave a comment below with any questions you might have. Or email me at prepperpenny@gmail.com.  Be sure to visit my FB Page at http://www.facebook.com/prepperpenny.  You can also follow me on Twitter or Pinterest at PrepperPenny.

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Soup, whether it’s winter or summer is a regular rotation in my meal planning.  With a side of bread and or salad, it’s a healthy way to get in a well-balanced meal.  This happens to be one that my family loves so I decided to make it into an easier recipe using my food storage.  I have worked inside and out all day and when it came to dinner time, I needed something fast.  I’ve cooked with my THRIVE for so long, it’s just a natural “go-to” meal for us.  Tonight I decided to convert our favorite Stuffed Green Pepper Soup recipe in to a convenient Meal In A Jar recipe.  No cutting veggies (which I didn’t have fresh anyway), no frying up ground beef (THRIVE is already cooked) and virtually no cleanup.  I was so pleased with the result that if you love the convenience of boil and serve Meals In A Jar, I knew you would love this easy recipe, too.

Stuffed Green Pepper Soup

Stuffed Green Pepper Soup

Meal In A Jar Newsletter

Prepping Jars

Stuffed Green Pepper Soup
Recipe Type: Soup
Cuisine: American
Author: PrepperPenny
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 35 mins
Serves: 6
This recipe converts my standard soup into a meal in a jar. It’s an excellent soup!
Ingredients
  • 1 Cup THRIVE Tomato Powder
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar
  • 1 tsp Garlic Granules or Powder
  • 2-3 Tbsp THRIVE Beef Bouillon Powder
  • 1 Cup THRIVE Freeze Dried Ground Beef
  • 1/2 Cup THRIVE Freeze Dried Onion
  • 1/2 Cup THRIVE Freeze Dried Tomato Chunks
  • 1/2 Cup Instant Rice
  • 1/2 Cup THRIVE Freeze Dried Green Pepper (Or Red/Green Bell Pepper)
Instructions
  1. Layer ingredients as I have listed them. You may need to shake (or pound) your jar as you fill it to make sure it all fits.
  2. Top with a 100cc Oxygen Absorber if you are not going to cook this for more than a few days. Or you can use you vacuum seal system to draw out the air.
  3. To Cook: Boil 10-12 cups of water and empty contents into it. Reduce boil to a simmer and cook (stirring frequently) for 20-30 minutes. You can add more water for a more brothy soup or cook to reduce for a thicker soup. Salt and Prepper to taste, serve with a side of sourdough bread and salad, enjoy!

 

To purchase any THRIVE Freeze Dried ingredients, please visit my store by clicking below!

For any THRIVE food, please visit my store by clicking here

For any THRIVE food, please visit my store by clicking here

 

 

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Finished MIJ ChiliI am married to a Texan.  A few things I learned to cook when we were married was bbq brisket, bbq beans and chili.  He really is a chili snob.  So I felt really challenged when I set out to make a dry version from the ingredients we have in our food storage.  After all, preparing for hard times is being affected as little as possible.  Having your favorite foods will make the hard times much easier and healthier to face.  It took a few tweaks, but I put a recipe together that he is very happy with and is regularly rotating into my menu.

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Add and adjust your personal preference in spices. Sprinkling a dash of red pepper will add some heat

As with any meal in a jar, they are quite pretty sitting in my glass front, antique cupboard.  But I have to say, these make adorable gifts, too.  I have given away many and always get great reviews.  With a decorative tag where you write or print the cooking instructions on and a mini-bottle of tabasco, they are a fun gift to give and look even more pretty in your cupboards.

For more information on freeze-dried food, I have put information in this document to answer questions you may have.   Meal In A Jar Newsletter.  For safely preparing your jars, I have put together this document  Prepping Jars

Chili Meal In A Jar
Recipe Type: Soup
Cuisine: American/Mexican
Author: PrepperPenny
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 35 mins
Serves: 4-6
Layer your ingredients in the order listed. You may have to lightly pound you jar on your countertop to get the ingredients to settle and fit in your 1 quart jar. If you have a vacuum seal system, use the attachment to draw out all the air. If you do not have one, you will need to add a 100cc oxygen absorber which will draw out any air.
Ingredients
  • 1/2 Cup THRIVE Tomato Powder
  • 1 Tbsp Chili Mix
  • 1 Tbsp Beef Bouillon
  • 1 Cup THRIVE Instant Red Beans
  • 2/3 Cup THRIVE Freeze-Dried Ground Beef
  • 1/3 Cup THRIVE Freeze-Dried Sausage Crumbles
  • 1/4 Cup THRIVE Freeze-Dried Onions
  • 1/2 Cup THRIVE Freeze-Dried Mixed Bell Peppers
  • 1/2 Cup THRIVE Freeze-Dried tomatoes
  • 1/4 Cup Celery
  • 1/4 Cup THRIVE Freeze-Dried Green Chili Peppers
Instructions
  1. Bring 8-10 cups of water to boil. Empty ingredients into the boiling water and reduce to a simmer. Cook for 30-45 minutes.
  2. Adjust salt, pepper and preferred spices to taste
  3. If you like chili mac, simply reduce the amount of instant beans and replace with the pasta of our choice. Or you can simply add pasta when you cook this meal.

 

For any THRIVE food, please visit my store by clicking here

For any THRIVE food, please visit my store by clicking here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Baby Powder

There are many more uses for baby powder than just on beautiful baby bottoms.  Making your own is frugal and is another step in avoiding commercial products leading to self-reliance!

Consider these uses and make your own:

Cool sheets in summer
Are those sticky, hot bed sheets giving you the summertime blues when you should be deep in dreamland? Cool things down by sprinkling a bit of baby powder between your sheets before hopping into the sack on warm summer nights.

Dry-shampoo your pet
Is the pooch’s coat in need of a pick-me-up? Vigorously rub a handful or two of baby powder into your pet’s fur. Let it settle in for a couple of minutes, and follow up with a thorough brushing. Your dog will both look and smell great! You can even occasionally “dry shampoo” your own, or someone else’s, hair by following the same technique.

Absorb grease stains on clothing
Frying foods can be dangerous business — especially for your clothes. If you get a grease splatter on your clothing, try dabbing the stain with some baby powder on a powder puff. Make sure you rub it in well, and then brush off any excess powder. Repeat until the mark is gone.

Clean your playing cards
Here’s a simple way to keep your playing cards from sticking together and getting grimy: Loosely place the cards in a plastic bag along with a bit of baby powder. Seal the bag and give it a few good shakes. When you remove your cards, they should feel fresh and smooth to the touch.

Slip on your rubber gloves
Don’t try jamming and squeezing your fingers into your rubber gloves when the powder layer inside the gloves wears out. Instead, give your fingers a light dusting with baby powder. Your rubber gloves should slide on good as new.

Remove mold from books
If some of your books have been stored in a less than ideal environment and have gotten a bit moldy or mildewed, try this: First, let them thoroughly air-dry. Then, sprinkle some baby powder between the pages and stand the books upright for several hours. Afterward, gently brush out the remaining powder from each book. They may not be as good as new, but they should be in a lot better shape than they were.

Dust off your flower bulbs
Many savvy gardeners use medicated baby powder to dust flower bulbs before planting them. Simply place 5-6 bulbs and about 3 tablespoons baby powder in a sealed plastic bag and give it a few gentle shakes. The medicated-powder coating helps both reduce the chance of rot and keep away moles, voles, grubs, and other bulb-munching pests.

Homemade Baby Powder
Author: PrepperPenny
Prep time: 5 mins
Total time: 5 mins
Ingredients
  • 1/2 Cup Corn Starch
  • 1/2 Cup Arrowroot Starch
  • 12 Drops Lavender Essential Oil
Instructions
  1. Pour into a glass shaker-top jar. Use a repurposed glass spice jar – it work great.

 

 

 

Source: bOrganic.net & Readers Digest

 

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Infused OilOne thing I strive to do in planning my home store, I try to make sure I either have or can make all the things my family and I enjoy in these “good” times.  I don’t want to be pulling out buckets of legumes and beans without having the flavors I’m accustom to going into them.  Simple things really do make life more comfortable.  And this technique to infusing oil is an example of planning to thrive while others struggle to survive.  Pay attention to the little things.  Those sometimes unnoticeable extra’s that you might take for granted.  This recipe was given to me to share by reader Tess Pavlin.  She has tried and tweaked this until she was sure it was wonderful and felt comfortable in making it public.  Win for us, right?

Infused oils will spice up your cooking and lend to wonderful healing and relaxing massages.

When you are ready to start making essential oil from your herbs, follow these four steps carefully:

  1. Put a handful of your herbs or flower heads into a clean glass jar. Choose either a single herb such Basil Infused Oilas basil or a mixture such as oregano, rosemary and thyme. Crush them to release the flavor into the carrier oil. Make absolutely sure your herbs are completely dry.  Water will likely make your oil go rancid.
  2. Pour 12 oz. of oil into the jar until the leaves or flowers are completely covered. Put a well-fitting top on the jar and let it stand in a warm (but not sunny) place shaking daily for two weeks.
  3. Straining Infused OilAfter the two weeks, strain off the herbs (use a cotton muslin cloth or an old open weave linen handkerchief) and then repeat the process of infusion with a fresh handful of your herbs (but using the same oil). Do this, as many times as necessary until you have a jar of strongly flavored aromatic oil.
  4. Store your aromatic oil in a small to medium-size sterilized bottle and label it. Clean the rim and tightly seal the cap to reduce the chances of air getting into the bottle. Make sure that you keep your stored oils out of sunlight.

Always remember:

Use a good-quality, mild-flavored oil such as sunflower oil or grapeseed oil. You don’t want the taste of the oil to compete with the flavor and smell of your herbs. For this reason you should avoid using extra virgin olive oil.Cover your herbs completely with oil during the infusing process. Any bits sticking out will oxidize and spoil the flavor of the oil.

Before storing the oil make sure you have removed all the plant material. (If you don’t the oil will become cloudy and sour)

WHAT OTHERs ARE DOING WITH THEIRs

Another way to speed up the process of infusing your oils is by using a small crock pot on its lowest setting.

  1. Gently bruise the herbs or flowers by crushing the in the palm of your hands before adding them to the pot. You can also press them with a wooden spoon or in a mortar and pestle but it is not necessary.
  2. Add 16 oz. of oil to the crock pot and turn heat on low. Add the herbs, leaves, or petals. Let simmer covered for 12 hours. Stir lightly and turn off overnight. Day 2 turn back on and simmer again for 12 hours. Day 3 repeat. Strain oils through cheesecloth to remove solids and bottle the oils. They will keep for a minimum of 3 years if tightly sealed.

Extra Tip:  Add 1/2 teaspoon of Vitamin E (per pint) to your beauty and medicinal oils to preserve them. You could also try using 15 drops of grapefruit seed extract.

Alternative methods.

1. OVEN INFUSED HOMEMADE OILS – Place your herbs in an oven safe dish and cover with the natural oil of your choice. Cover the dish and place in the oven at 200 degrees or the lowest possible setting your oven has. Cook for three hours. While it’s still warm, strain through cheese cloth and squeeze the oil from the herbs. Pour the oil into a sterile bottle or jar.

2. STOVE TOP INFUSED OILS – Using a double boiler, GENTLY simmer oil and herbs for 2 hours. Strain through cheese cloth. For a stronger infusion repeat using the same oil and fresh herbs.

Infused oild in crockpot3. CROCK POT INFUSED HOMEMADE OILS – This method can only be used if your crock pot has a “warm” or very low setting! This works great for infusing several oils at once. Fill your sterile pint jars with your herbs and oils. Place the jars in the crock pot and cook on low for eight hours. You can do up to 5 different oils at once with this method depending on the size of your crock pot!

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