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pictures_with_words copy 6Nectar of the gods. . . glorious coffee.  I can’t imagine my life without it.  No only for its amazing flavor and energy boost is offers, but as images-14one who suffers with migraines, caffeine has been prescribed to me to help control them.  For me, it works really well.  As much as I love my morning cup (or 2, or 3) of java, hot coffee is not appetizing in the middle of the day during the hottest parts of summer.  Iced coffee is always a great option which I partook in by stopping at a local espresso stand drive thru, but at nearly $6 for a large double shot, it can get really expensive.  Besides that, I’m busy in the garden most summer days.  I don’t have time to get to the coffee shops.  My solution?  Making it myself for a fraction of the cost.  If you love your iced coffee, you really need to try this simple and delicious recipe.  It just might destroy the relationship between you and your favorite barista.  Honestly, no coffee-house has anything better than this blend.  And you will save a LOT of money!

I had a pound of whole coffee beans in my freezer that I used in this demonstration.  However, a rough ground bag is just as good.  Buy the least expensive brand you can get at your local supermarket works just as well as the expensive ones.  So save yourself some money and avoid the expensive brands.

Plus, you will be getting three separate recipes in this one post.  Obviously the iced coffee.  But I will show you how to make vanilla extract that you can use to make your own creamer!  Check out the links and video.

Now, gather a few things you will need:

 

pictures_with_words copy 8 1 pound course ground coffee – I keep my coffee beans whole and grind them as I need them.  For this large batch, I use my wonderful Ninja. But you can buy whole beans at the store and grind them on the course setting next to the whole beans (if you grocer offers them).

1 gallon plus 1 quart warm water – This will yield right at a full gallon of espresso-type coffee

PrepperPenny’s Vanilla Creamer using my homemade Vanilla Extract (check out my You Tube video at the end of this page)

Large air-tight container – Tall and thin or short and round, just make sure it is airtight and will allow your coffee to stay saturated

Colander(s) – As you will see, I use several sizes to make sure my grounds are completely removed and my espresso is dark and rich but not foggy

 

Pour luke warm water over coffee grounds

Pour luke warm water over coffee grounds

Simply empty your 1 pound of coffee into your container and pour warm water over it.

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Place in airtight container and refrigerate for 24 hours

In a large, airtight container, pour 1 gallon plus 1 quart of warm water.  Give a quick stir to moisten all grounds and place the lid on.  Place in your refrigerator for 24 hours.

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Straining equipment

You are almost done.  No stirring  or shaking.  After 24 hours, you have en amazingly strong cold espresso.  Now you need to strain it several times until you have removed any debris.  I start with a larger colander first, move to a finer mesh and finish with butter cloth.  You want to be sure to strain it enough to make a dark, rich coffee without any trace of the coffee grounds, otherwise your coffee will become cloudy.

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Dark enough that you can’t see through it

Your coffee will be  dark and strong you will not be able to see through it!  That’s exactly what you want.

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Now it’s time to assemble your iced coffee.   This is where you will use a combination to meet your specific taste.  I like my iced coffee creamy, so I mix coffee and creamer at a 50/50 ratio.  If you like stronger coffee, use less creamer and more coffee.  You can use your favorite plain or flavored creamer, the same kind you might buy in the grocers.  I make my own vanilla creamer which is what I use.  Click here for that simple recipe.

Add sugar or favorite sweetener, top with whipped cream and enjoy!  From experience, I can say that it will keep well in your refrigerator for at least two weeks.  Beyond that, it’s trial.  Mine has never made it past that two-week mark.

Iced Coffee

Rich iced coffee

Kick it into the stratosphere and make your own vanilla extract to use in your own creamer.  This is my video to make your own extract.  It’s great in this recipe and amazing for all recipes calling for it.

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I am always excited and look for ways to build my shelf-stable pantry with inexpensive food.  But inexpensive sure does not mean inferior.  Especially when it comes to the topic I address today.

If you are new or have never pressure canned anything, chicken is the single simplest food to start with.  It’s the first thing I canned and highly recommend it.

You may or may not have heard of a company called Zaycon Foods.  Rather than explaining it to you, here is a great video to explain it all.  In short, it’s cheap, fresh and healthy!

Having been introduced to Zaycon, I’m a devoted advocate and client.  To learn more, please click here

But having just purchased 40 pounds of their chicken breasts, I had to get them processed as quickly as possible.  I set out to pressure can most of it.

Supplies

 

 

Start by gathering all your supplies.  You need your jars, rings, lids, jar lifter, sharp knife (for trimming your chicken), pressure canner, saucepan (large enough accommodate the lids and rings you will be sanitizing).

 

 

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Before you start anything, inspect the rubber ring in your canner (if you are using a canner with this), inspect the vent to make sure there is no obstructions, making sure there is no blockage.  I hope you can see here the blue color in the center of this photo.  It is your view through the vent in the lid of your canner.

 

 

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I begin by getting my jars ready by washing them in hot, soapy water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Get into the habit of checking each jar for any imperfections.  While I wash my jars, I run my finger around the rim to feel for any cracks or other anomalies.

 

 

 

 

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Also, do a visual inspection of each of your jars.  While new jars rarely have cracks or other imperfections, they sometimes do.  And if you are re-using jars, the risk is higher so be sure to use only those jars that are pristine!

 

 

 

 

 

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You have several options for keeping your jars hot while you prepare your chicken.  You can keep them in a large stockpot covered with simmering water or you can do as I do, keep them in a warm oven.  I set mine at 200 degrees.

 

 

 

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Now I put about 3 quarts of water and about 1/8th of a cup of white vinegar in my pressure canner over a low flame (or heat if you are electric).  The vinegar is not necessary if you have soft water.  Mine is a little hard and this will prevent lime buildup in my canner and jars.  It is completely optional.

 

 

 

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After washing your lids and rings, place them in your saucepan over a low simmer.  You do not want to boil them.  Just warm enough to soften the wax or rubber ring.

 

 

 

 

 

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One-by-one, I pull out a hot jar and trim and cut my chicken and put them into my jars leaving a 1” headspace.  Whether I am handling raw meat or removing food from my dehydrator, I wear gloves.  In dehydrating, I don’t want to transfer my oils onto the food I just dry.  For raw meat, it is a level of safety.

 

 

 

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I immediately place the filled jar into the canner.  I do not put the lids or rings on them yet.  This will keep the jars hot which is important so they don’t break when the canner comes to temperature.

 

 

 

 

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Once my canner is full of jars, I will put a pinch of salt in each jar.  I use Pink Himalayan because it contains every bit of its’ minerals.  But you can use canning salt.

 

 

 

 

 

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This step is critical in all canning projects.  Never, ever forget to wipe and clean your rims before adding your lids.  When I can meat or food that is particularly oily, I use white vinegar which cuts the greasy residue.

 

 

 

 

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I use metal lids when I use new jars.  But they are good for only one use.  When I buy replacement lids, I purchase either Tattler or 4ever Recap lids.  If you are interested in these lids, here is a video to help you see their value.  I would post one for 4ever Recaps, but could not find one.  But they are essentially the same.  One thing I love about 4ever is that it is a woman owned company.  Hey, it’s personal.  I respect women entrepreneurs.

 

 

 

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As you can see, the same metal rings are used with these lids and can be used several times.

 

 

 

 

 

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With the jars all inside the canner and the lid securely in place, increase the heat under it to build pressure.  In this picture, you can be (behind) the vent where you will place the weight.  In the foreground is another vent on my specific Presto canner.  Not all canners have this.  But if yours does, as pressure builds this element will rattle and shake until stem builds up.  When enough steam builds, this vent will rise and shut allowing the pressure to continue to build.  When this happens, the vent that receives your weight (the one shown in the background) will begin to spew steam.  I allow this to build for 10 minutes before placing the weight on it.

 

 

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This batch contains pint size jars.  I processed it with 10 pounds of pressure for 75 minutes as per the Ball Complete Book.  After 75 minutes, you will turn off your heat and allow the pressure to level out.  This takes about an hour in most cases.  Once the vent in the front drops back into its’ normal position, it will be safe to remove the weight as shown in this photo.  But you must still use caution because your metal canner is still very hot and can cause serious burns.   But you can now remove the canner lid.

 

 

 

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After you remove the canner lid, you will begin taking your jars out of the canner and placing them onto your counter using your jar lifter.  Please, never try using anything but a canning jar lifter.  This can be quite dangerous if you try using tongs or anything else not specifically designed to safely handle boiling hot jars.  The foods in these jars are still boiling aggressively.

 

 

 

 

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You will not allow your jars to set out on your counter overnight to allow them to completely cool down.   You do not want them to be moved or disturbed while they cool and the rings set on the rims.  When using metal lids, you will begin hearing a distinctive “ping” as they seal.  Music to your ears!

 

 

 

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The following morning, I removed all the rings from my jars and tested their seal.  To do this, you simply lift the jar by the rings.  If it sealed as it should have, they will not release.  Now they are ready to be washed because the jars will be oily and a bit icky.  Just wash them in warm, soapy water, rinse and allow to dry.

 

 

 

 

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Once the jars and lids are completely dry, label then with content and date.  In large batches, it’s easy to just print out labels.  If it’s just a few cans, just use a permanent marker to write it on the lids.

 

 

 

 

 

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My yield for approximately 25 pounds of chicken was a dozen pints and six 1 ½ pint jars.  You can store them all in the boxes they came in.

 

 

 

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But I have a canning pantry that beautifully shows off my healthy food and keeps it all readily available for my regular menu planning.  This antique cabinet has two glass-front doors so all my company can see and covet my invaluable prepping skills.

 

 

 

As you can see, following standard practices for sanitation and canning, chicken is quite easy to pressure can.   If you are just beginning to try your hand at pressure canning, this is one of the absolute easiest recipes you will find.  Buying in bulk is cost-effective.  Having your investment safely stored in canning jars requires no electricity and is shelf-stable for up to two years.

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Finally, just to show you that having a jar or two that does not seal only allows you to eat it sooner!  I had one jar that did not seal properly.  But the food inside is still perfectly fine.  I simply added barbeque sauce and we had sandwiches for lunch.   I always plan on how to incorporate whatever I can into a meal within about a week.  And by having this happen to one of my jars allows me to show you how beautiful the canned chicken is.  As you can see, it’s much like canned tuna.  You can see how moist and flaky it is.  You can use this for chicken salad, on green salads, in soups and stews, enchiladas.  Just use your imagination.  It has so many delicious uses.

 

 

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apf_jar_doneThis is a delicious and easy recipe for always having apple pie filling on-hand and in your pantry.  This recipe is so easy and cost effective, you will never buy it in cans again.  Unlike store-bought pie fillings, you have complete control of the ingredients that go into it and can adjust the flavor to satisfy your unique taste.

This recipe does not have to be canned.  It can be frozen or can be used immediately.  But if you want to can it to build up your home store, it needs to be water bath canned for 25 minutes for quart jars.

The recipe calls for Clear Jel.  Please don’t use any other product because the results may not be favorable.  Here is a little information about this product from the Washington State University.

Clear Jel® is a corn starch derivative, and is a commercial thickening product used by bakeries and for frozen food. This product is used the same as flour or corn starch. Not only can it be used in preserved pie fillings but it can be used anywhere you would use flour or cornstarch as a thickener. It makes great clear gravy without the lumps, as well as puddings and sauces. It is used widely by bakeries and restaurants.

There are two types of Clear Jel®, “instant” and “regular”. “Instant” does not require heat to thicken. The product will thicken once the liquid is added. “Regular”, on the other hand, must be heated. When canning pie fillings, be sure to use the ‘regular’ Clear Jel® product.

For this recipe, use “regular” Clear Jel.

 

Apple Pie Filling
Recipe Type: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Author: PrepperPenny via PickYourOwn.org
Prep time: 15 mins
Cook time: 25 mins
Total time: 40 mins
Serves: 1 pie
This recipe is based on making 1 quart of pie filling. If you want more, just multiply the recipe by how much you want to make. Follow safe canning procedures by sanitizing your jar(s), lid(s) and ring(s). Process the canned pie filling in a water bath canner for 25 minutes.
Ingredients
  • 3-1/2 Cups Apples, peeled, cored and sliced
  • 1 Cup Granulated Sugar or you can replace with other sweetener
  • 5 Tbsp Clear Jel®
  • 1/2 tsp Cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp Nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp Cloves
  • 1/4 tsp Ginger
  • 1/4 tsp Allspice
  • 1/2 Cup Cold Water
  • 3/4 Cup Apple juice
  • 2 Tbsp Fresh or Bottled Lemon Juice
Instructions
  1. Prepare you apples. Blanch them in 1 gallon of boiling water for 1 minute. Drain and keep the hot cooked fruit in a covered bowl or pot.
  2. Combine the remaining ingredients into a saucepan and cook (stirring constantly) until the flavors marry and liquid thickens.
  3. Using your hot, sanitized jar(s), begin layering apples and liquid. The liquid will be thick so you will need to layer the apples, liquid, apples, liquid about 3-4 layers of each per quart jar until it is full.
  4. Wipe the rim of your jar(s), add the lid and ring and process in your water bath canner for 25 minutes.
  5. When making your 8″ pie, use as little of the liquid as necessary. This will make for a crispier pie crust and prevent it from being soggy. But I save it, heat it and pour it over the pie (and ice cream if serving it ala mode) as a delicious syrup.

 

Layer your ingredients

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Photo’s via PickYourOwn

 

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Cheesy-Potato-and-Bacon-Soup_1

 

 

A delicious soup from food storage by THRIVE Life.

Click here for the full recipe

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Holidays are great beyond just celebrating holy and other meaningful events in human history.  It’s a time to share meals, gather families and introduce traditions to our new generations.  Beyond that, holiday celebrations come with wonderful sales that allows families, especially those on tight budgets to fill their pantries with inexpensive but delicious food.  Easter is a perfect example of that.  Ham.  There are so many things to cook with ham and making leftovers into soups and stews provides for a variety of options that can feed a family for many months ahead.

First I will share a general recipe I follow.  I cook many things like this without actually measuring.  I did do my best to record what I did this time.  But keep in mind that this is a base recipe and you can add any other kinds of ingredients that you prefer.  You may want more carrots or you may want to add other vegetables.  Maybe you have a special spice that you want to add.  Do it!  The canning process will be the same.  Make it the way your family loves.

Canning Ham & Beans
Recipe Type: Soup
Cuisine: American
Author: PrepperPenny
Prep time: 30 mins
Cook time: 90 mins
Total time: 2 hours
Serves: LOTS
Cut all ingredients into similar size pieces
Ingredients
  • 4 Pounds Dry White Beans
  • 3 Pounds of Baked Ham, cut into similarly sized pieces
  • 4 Tbsp Chicken Bouillon (Optional)
  • 5 Stalks of Celery
  • 2 Medium Size Yellow Onions
  • 5 Large Carrots
  • Salt & Pepper To Taste
  • 4 Bay Leaves
  • Smoked Paprika to add smokey flavor
  • Dried Parsley
  • Celery Salt
Instructions
  1. Clean and soak beans overnight
  2. Rinse Beans and return to large stockpot
  3. Add all ingredients
  4. Cover with water and cook for about an hour before proceeding to pressure canning

 

 

Canning Your Ham & Beans . . . Step-By-Step

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Let’s begin with a friendly reminder.  These scraps are perfect to save in the freezer until you have enough to make your own vegetable stock or for making meat and seafood stock.  So never throw them out.  I keep a one gallon ziplock bag in my freezer and am always dropping in all my fresh vegetable scraps.  And yes, the skins from my onions, too!  How about that for free food!


pictures_with_words copy 8After having cleaned, rinsed and soaked your beans overnight or for several hours, chop your veggies and ham and dump it all into a large stockpot.  Then cover it with water and put onto a low but sustained simmer.

2-13116 jar lifter in use LARGE

Now is the time to get your jars, rings and lids ready and gather all your canning utensils.  There are a few ways folks clean their jars.  Some run them through the dishwasher.  Personally, I wash everything in hot, soapy water then put into my oven at 200 degrees which gives me confidence that they are as clean and sanitized as possible.  It’s also a habit of mine to run my bare finger across the rim to check for any flaws or chips.  I also give a visual inspection of every jar to be sure there are no cracks or flaws in the jar.  Any jar that shows signs of flaws should be set aside and should never be used for canning.

Canning jars absolutely must be kept warm to receive the hot ingredients.  When I first began canning, I made a terrible mistake by not having them hot enough and had two jars fail (break) in the canner.  Lesson learned.  Now you want to add 2″-3″ of water and begin to heat your pressure canner.

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With all things ready, lets begin to can your soup.  Using a ladle and canning funnel, fill your hot jars with a 1″ head space.  Make sure there are no air bubbles lurking in your jar.  Using a plastic spatula, remove any bubbles.  Failing to do so could cause your jar to break in the canner.

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I can’t stress enough how important ALL sanitary measures are at every stage in canning.  But making sure you wipe the rims after filling your jars is as crucial as any.  Any trace of food or oil can prevent your jars from sealing, and can (and likely will) cause your food to spoil and go rancid.  When canning anything oily, like meat, I use white vinegar which will satisfactorily remove the oils.

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After having your lids and rings warmed in boiling water, carefully remove them and immediately place them on the jars.

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Before the wax ring on you lid can cool, place your ring on the jar and tighten it enough to hold the lid in place.  Don’t over tighten the rings.  Simply finger tighten it.  Immediately place your jar into the canner at this point.

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Once your canner is filled, place the lid on it and follow your specific canner guidelines and process your jars at 10 pounds of pressure for 75 minutes in pint jars, 90 minutes in quart jars.

Allow the pressure in your canner to completely dissipate before trying to remove the pressure weight.  Once the pressure is zero, you may remove the lid.  However, everything is still very hot!  Please use proper caution and care.

pictures_with_words copy 2Using a canning jar lifter, remove your jars from your canner and gently place them onto a towel and carefully tighten the rings.  Leave your jars to cool for at least 10 hours.  When you remove your jars, you will see they are still boiling.  This is normal.  You will begin to hear that heavenly confirmation that all canners love so much.  The ping.  That is the indication that your jars are sealing properly.  Don’t be discouraged if one or more does not seal.  It sometimes happens.

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Once your cans have set and cooled (usually overnight), remove the rings and test the seals.  As indicated above, you can test by sound by tapping a spoon on the lid (I have never done that), give a physical inspection looking to see if the raised nipple has con caved.  It is quite easy to see if a lid hasn’t sealed because the nipple will protrude if it didn’t seal properly.  If you are not quite sure, press on the center of the lid.  It should not give and should be hard.  I always pick up my jars by the very top rim.  If the lid isn’t sealed, it will pull off the jar.  If this happens, you can put your contents into a container and either refrigerate it and eat it within a few days, or freeze it for later use.

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Now you will want to wash each jar with hot, soapy water, add your label with the content and date you canned it.

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This batch I just canned wound up yielding 14 jars.  To help protect them, I put my jars back into the box they came out of.  Notice here, when I opened this box, I cut off the top of the plastic wrap leaving the bottom of it intact over the box.  If one of your jars happens to break or leak without you noticing it, the plastic will save you from having an even bigger mess.

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THRIVE Rice A Roni

I’ve always loved Rice-A-Roni!  I’m thrilled to have found this recipe to offer my family anytime.  And because it’s made with food storage, you can make up batches and store in jars or bags.  Great also for hiking and camping trips.  Just be sure to keep the onions, celery and spaghetti pieces in a separate bag (in the container with the other ingredients) so you can rehydrate them prior to sautéing them.   Here, you will control the ingredients.  To compare, here is the ingredients from the Rice-A-Roni box.

RICE, WHEAT FLOUR, DURUM WHEAT SEMOLINA, SALT, SUGAR, AUTOLYZED YEAST EXTRACT*, HYDROLYZED SOY PROTEIN, ONIONS*, MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE, NATURAL FLAVOR, PARSLEY*, GARLIC*, CHICKEN BROTH*, CHICKEN FAT, TURMERIC SPICE WHICH IMPARTS COLOR, HYDROLYZED CORN GLUTEN, NIACIN*, DISODIUM GUANYLATE, DISODIUM INOSINATE, FERRIC ORTHOPHOSPHATE, FERROUS SULFATE, THIAMIN MONONITRATE, TURMERIC EXTRACT, FOLIC ACID, RIBOFLAVIN.

Really, if I can’t pronounce it or know exactly what it is or where it comes from, I think I don’t want to feed it to my family.  With THRIVE, you know what is in it.  No additives, preservatives or artificial flavors.  Now that’s reassuring.

THRIVE-Style Rice-A-Roni
Recipe Type: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Author: Roni via THRIVE Life
Prep time: 3 mins
Cook time: 20 mins
Total time: 23 mins
Serves: 6
In snack-size ziplock bag, keep the onion, spaghetti pieces and celery separate so you can rehydrate them. All other ingredients can be layered or just
Ingredients
  • 3 Tbsp Butter
  • 1⁄3 C THRIVE Freeze-Dried Onion rehydrated
  • 1⁄2 C THRIVE Freeze-Dried Celery, rehydrated
  • 1 C Spaghetti Noodles, broken into 1 inch pieces
  • 1 C White Rice
  • 1⁄2 tsp Sage
  • 2 1⁄2 C Water
  • 4 tsp THRIVE Chicken Bullion
Instructions
  1. Sautee onion, celery, and spaghetti pieces in butter over medium heat until spaghetti pieces are golden brown. Add rice and sage and stir until coated with butter. Add water and bouillon and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer until rice is tender.

 

celery_1Onionchicken-bouillon

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THRIVE Powdered TomatoMy THRIVE Tomato Powder is one of the most used dried product I use in my house because it is so easy and versatile.  I make so many delicious recipes from it.  I make  tomato paste, tomato sauce and I use it in many dry-canned Meals In A Jar that I have posted here on my blog.

THRIVE Tomato Powder is dehydrated tomatoes and nothing else.  No additives, flavors or preservative.

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I love using it and feel good knowing I’m serving my family food that is good and healthy for them.   Here, I would like to share how to easily make ketchup within about 30 minutes with almost no prep-time necessary.

This ketchup is quick to make, customizable to meet your unique taste and is just another product you can make at home to add to your home store and control the ingredients you and your family eats.

 

THRIVE Tomato Ketchup
Recipe Type: Condiment
Cuisine: American
Author: PrepperPenny
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 30 mins
Total time: 35 mins
Yields 1 quart and is ready for last minute use.
Ingredients
  • 4 Cups Water
  • 1 Cup Thrive Tomato Powder
  • 1/3 Cup Honey/Sugar/Sweetener
  • ¼ Cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp Onion Powder
  • 2 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp Pepper
  • ½ tsp Mustard Powder
  • ½ tsp Celery Salt
  • 1/8 tsp Allspice
  • Dash of Worcestershire Sauce or 1 tsp dry Worcestershire powder
Instructions
  1. Add all ingredients into saucepan and simmer for approximately 30 minutes. Allow to set up 6 hours. It will have a strong vinegar taste until all the flavors settle and have time to blend completely.
  2. Store in airtight container in the refrigerator. Good for approximately 8 weeks.

 

How I Built My Home Store

THRIVE tomato-powder

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